1. Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia)

Courtyard of Buehler Alumni/Visitor Center
The Chinese elm is a semi-evergreen, medium sized tree with an arching habit and an interesting flaking pattern to the bark. (back to top)




2. evergreen maple (Acer oblongum)

Courtyard of Buehler Alumni/Visitor Center
The evergreen maple is a medium-sized tree with a bushy round canopy, smooth leathery leaves, and small winged fruit. (back to top)




3. river birch (Betula nigra)

Northeast of Buehler Alumni/Visitor Courtyard
The river birch is a medium sized deciduous tree, often multi-trunked, with peeling bark. On younger trees, the bark is whitish, but on older trees it is a salmon color. (back to top)




4. huingan (Schinus polygamus)

Old Davis Rd., north of Buehler Alumni/Visitor Center
The huingan tree is a medium-sized evergreen tree with a round canopy. It is considered highly invasive in parts of California. (back to top)




5. shiny xylosma (Xylosma congestum)

Old Davis Rd., west of Environmental Horticulture
The xylosma is a small evergreen tree with shiny leaves. This plant can also be maintained as a shrub or clipped hedge. (back to top)




6. jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi)

Old Davis Rd., at entrance to arboretum
The jeffrey pine is a tall, evergreen, cone-bearing tree. The deep furrows of its bark are a distinguishing characteristic - bark is also said to have a vanilla scent. (back to top)




7. California bay tree (Umbellularia californica)

East end of bridge in arboretum, near Mary Wattis Brown garden
The California bay is a tall evergreen tree. Leaves have a scent somewhat similar to that of sweet bay, and can be used as its substitute in cooking, but the odor and flavor are much more pungent. (back to top)




8. takeshima flowering cherry (Prunus takesimensis)

East of Mrak, on the bank of Lake Spafford
This flowering cherry is a deciduous, medium-sized tree which may have multiple branches. Flowers appear before foliage in early spring. (back to top)




9. Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum)

East of Mrak Hall
The Chinese tallow is a tall, narrow, deciduous tree with small heart shaped leaves that have outstanding fall color before they drop. (back to top)




10. Chinese fringe tree (Chionanthus retusus)

West bank of Lake Spafford
The Chinese fringe tree is a medium-sized tree with a round canopy and interesting bark. Fragrant creamy white flowers appear in spring. (back to top)




11. formosan redwood (Taiwania cryptomerioides)

Northwest bank of Lake Spafford
This is a tall evergreen tree with a pyramid shape. Branches are long and drooping with blue green needles. (back to top)




12. ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)

Lawn area north of Lake Spafford
The ginkgo is a tall deciduous tree with fan shaped leaves. The fall color of this tree is an outstanding bright yellow. (back to top)




13. coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens)

North end Lake Spafford, near bridge: part of the Arboretum's Redwood Memorial Grove
The coast redwood is a tall evergreen tree with a pyramid shape. This tree usually has a single trunk, but can often be multi-trunked in the wild. This is the most commonly planted tree on campus. (back to top)




14. dawn redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides)

Northwest of Wyatt Pavillion by bridge
The dawn redwood is a tall deciduous cone-bearing tree. Its leaflets hang gracefully from the branches, giving this tree a soft textured appearance. (back to top)




15. pacingo pine (Pinus pseudostrobus)

West side of Music Building
The pacingo pine is a tall, evergreen, cone-bearing plant with five needles in each bundle. (back to top)




16. camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora)

Courtyard north of Wright Hall
The camphor tree is a tall evergreen tree with a round canopy. It has thick, sturdy branches and small, glossy leaves. (back to top)




17. black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia)

Southwest corner of Shields Library
The black locust is a medium-sized tree with showy pea-shaped flowers in the spring. (back to top)




18. deodar cedar (Cedrus deodara)

Southwest corner of Shields Library
The deodar cedar is a tall, evergreen, cone-bearing tree. Its silhouette shows off its graceful limbs, which are dramatic and can weep to the ground. (back to top)




19. Turkish oak (Quercus cerris)

Courtyard of Shields Library
The Turkish oak is a tall deciduous tree with a broad canopy. This is the only Turkish oak planted on campus. (back to top)




20. London plane tree (Platanus x hispanica)

Plaza west of Shields Library, near egghead
The London plane is a tall deciduous tree with an interesting flaking pattern to the bark. It is used often as a street tree, known for filtered shade and the ability to landscape underneath. (back to top)




21. European elm (Ulmus procera)

Plaza west of Shields Library, near egghead
The European elm is a tall, deciduous tree with a broad canopy. Makes an excellent street tree but is susceptible to Dutch Elm disease. (back to top)




22. saucer magnolia (Magnolia x soulangeana)

North side of Shields Library
The saucer magnolia is a small, deciduous tree with a shrubby habit. Its bold flowers appear in the early spring before leaves reappear, making it a favorite garden specimen. (back to top)




23. cork oak (Quercus suber)

East Quad Ave.
The cork oak is a tall evergreen tree with a dense canopy. The bark is deeply furrowed on older specimens, and is often harvested for commercial cork. (back to top)




24. bald cypress (Taxodium distichum)

South of Dutton Hall
The bald cypress is a tall cone-bearing tree that loses its leaves in the winter. It is one of just two deciduous conifers on this tree walk (dawn redwood the other deciduous conifer). (back to top)




25. Oriental arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis)

South of Dutton Hall
The oriental arborvitae is a tall evergreen tree. Smaller varieties of this plant can be used for hedges or screens. (back to top)




26. eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis)

West of Dutton
The eastern redbud is a small ornamental tree with a round canopy and heart shaped leaves. It has clusters of deep pink blooms in the early spring. (back to top)




27. silk oak (Grevillea robusta)

Southwest corner of North Hall
The silk oak is a tall evergreen tree with lacy leaves. Its yellow-orange flowers appear in late spring and attract hummingbirds. (back to top)




28. southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora)

East Quad
The southern magnolia is a tall, evergreen tree with a dense canopy. Its has large, glossy green leaves and showy white flowers. (back to top)




29. atlas cedar (Cedrus libani ssp. atlantica 'Glauca')

East Quad
The Atlas cedar is a tall, evergreen cone-bearing tree with bluish needles. (back to top)




30. Chinese pistache (Pistachia chinensis)

Southeast of Memorial Union
The Chinese pistache is a tall deciduous tree with a round canopy and outstanding fall color. Females display clusters of red berries in the late fall and winter. It is a versatile tree, used in patios, lawns, or as a street tree. (back to top)




31. Chinese flame tree (Koelreuteria bipinnata)

South courtyard of Memorial Union
The Chinese flame tree is a medium-sized tree with a spreading canopy. Large clusters of delicate yellow flowers appear in summer followed by fruits that are shaped like paper lanterns. (back to top)




32. holly oak (Quercus ilex)

Southwest of Social Science and Humanities, on East Quad Ave.
The holly oak is a tall and broad evergreen tree. Its leaves are small and closely spaced on the branches, creating a dense canopy. (back to top)




33. Mediterranean fan palm (Chamaerops humilis)

Southwest corner of Hickey Gym, against west-facing wall
The Mediterranean fan palm is a small multi-trunked tree. It can tolerate colder temperatures than other palms, but prefers a warmer climate. (back to top)




34. windmill palm (Trachycarpus fortunei)

West side of Hickey Gym
The windmill palm is a hardy, medium-sized, fast growing palm. The trunk on younger trees has a fibrous mat. (back to top)




35. Canary Island date palm (Phoenix canariensis)

Northwest corner of Hickey Gym
The Canary Island date palm is a medium-sized palm with dramatic foliage. Fronds are long and arching, clusters of small yellow flowers appear in summer and are followed by yellow orange fruit. (back to top)




36. Mexican fan palm (Washingtonia robusta)

Intersection of Howard Way and North Quad Ave., in grassy area
The Mexican fan palm is a fast growing palm that is tall and slender. (back to top)




37. coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia)

Next to visitor information kiosk on Howard Way
The coast live oak is a tall evergreen tree that is native to California's coast. Has smooth grey bark and small, stiff, toothed leaves. (back to top)




38. valley oak (Quercus lobata)

Northwest of Freeborn Hall, on the corner of West Quad Ave. and North Quad Ave.
The valley oak is a tall deciduous tree that has a broad canopy and large twisted limbs. One of the largest oaks - native to California. (back to top)




39. bradford pear (old) (Pyrus calleryana 'Bradford')

Northeast side of Wickson Hall
The Bradford pear is a deciduous ornamental tree with pretty white spring blossoms and excellent fall color. The fruit of the Bradford pear is inedible. (back to top)




40. mayten (Maytenus boaria)

East side of Veihmeyer Hall
The mayten tree is a medium-sized tree with graceful weeping branches. (back to top)




41. bradford pear (new) (Pyrus calleryana 'Bradford')

Courtyard of Plant Sciences Bldg.
The Bradford pear is a deciduous ornamental tree with pretty white spring blossoms and excellent fall color. The fruit of the Bradford pear is inedible. (back to top)




42. Texas umbrella tree (Melia azedarach)

North Quad Ave., in front of Wickson Hall
The Texas umbrella tree is a medium-sized, fast growing tree with an irregular habit. It has delicate light purple flowers in spring. (back to top)




43. Chinese hackberry (Celtis sinensis)

West of Plant and Environmental Sciences, on California Ave.
The Chinese hackberry is a tall tree with a broad canopy. Good street tree; has smooth leaves with scalloped edges and small berry like fruits. (back to top)




44. goldenrain tree (Koelreuteria paniculata)

Northwest of Plant and Environmental Sciences, adjacent to Parking Lot 14
The goldenrain tree is a medium-sized tree that has clusters of delicate yellow flowers followed by papery fruit capsules. (back to top)




45. crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica)

Northeast corner Cruess Hall
The crape myrtle is a popular, small, ornamental tree with colorful flowers appearing in summer, and an interesting flaking pattern to the bark. (back to top)




46. silk tree (Albizia julibrissin)

North of Cruess Hall
The silk tree is a medium-sized tree with a spreading canopy. Has feathery yellowish green leaves and salmon-pink flowers. (back to top)




47. Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis)

North side of Cruess Hall
The Chinese juniper is a medium-sized evergreen tree. Leaves have a distinct smell when crushed. (back to top)




48. olive tree (Olea europaea)

Regan Hall Dr., in the median of the roadway
The olive tree is a small, slow growing, evergreen tree with grey green foliage and edible fruit (when properly cured). (back to top)




49. Chinese scholar tree (Sophora japonica)

Courtyard of Housing Cooperatives
The Chinese scholar tree is a tall deciduous tree with cream colored flowers followed by long bead-like green pods. It is considered messy because of the amount of fruit and flower drop. (back to top)




50. fruitless mulberry (Morus alba)

Southwest of Regan Hall
The fruitless mulberry is a tall, deciduous, fast-growing tree that provides good shade. Has many surface roots and is difficult to garden under. Its large heart shaped leaves are often used in the cultivation of silkworms. (back to top)




51. African sumac (Rhus lancea)

North of Housing Office, facing Regan Hall Dr.
The African sumac is a small, slow growing, evergreen tree with long slender leaves and multiple trunks. Has spreading habit with weeping branches. (back to top)




52. fruitless purple leaf plum (Prunus x blireana)

South of Housing Office, near main entrance
The fruitless purple leaf plum is a popular, small, deciduous street tree. The foliage is deep purple and bright pink flowers appear in early spring. (back to top)




53. red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis)

West of traffic circle near Housing Office
The red gum is a large evergreen tree with a spreading crown. The leaves are long, linear, and fragrant when crushed. Needs plenty of room to grow, good for highways and large parks. (back to top)




54. red oak (Quercus rubra)

Traffic circle south of Housing Office
The red oak is a fast growing, medium sized, deciduous tree with beautiful fall color. (back to top)




55. eucalyptus grove (Eucalyptus, several species)

Northwest of Hoagland Hall
Most eucalyptus are native to Australia where more that 600 species grow. This grove of eucalyptus is composed of at least 5 different species. (back to top)




56. honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos inermis)

South of the Food Science building
The honey locust is a tall deciduous tree with an open branching habit. The flowers are sweet pea shaped and the fruits are borne in pods. (back to top)




57. Japanese zelkova (Zelkova serrata)

North of Hoagland Hall
The Japanese zelkova is a tall deciduous tree with a broad canopy. Oblong serrated leaves are clustered and produce filtered shade. (back to top)




58. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis)

Northeast of Hoagland Hall
The Canary Island pine is a tall, cone-bearing, evergreen tree with long, shiny, drooping needles. (back to top)




59. strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo)

South side of Cruess Hall, against building
The strawberry tree is a small evergreen tree with interesting bark. The fruit is colorful and attracts birds. (back to top)




60. California pepper tree (Schinus molle)

South of Cruess Hall, near traffic circle
The California pepper tree is a medium-sized tree with fern-like leaves that are aromatic when crushed. Its large trunk is covered with flaky bark. Small rose colored berries follow creamy flowers. (back to top)




61. caucasian fir tree (Abies nordmanniana)

Southeast of Cruess Hall, near traffic circle
The Caucasian fir tree is a tall, narrow, evergreen tree with large cones. It is not often planted in the Central Valley region. (back to top)




62. California black walnut (Juglans hindsii)

Southwest of California Ave. and North Quad St., near traffic circle
The California black walnut is a deciduous tree with a wide canopy. Nuts are edible and wood is valued for timber. (back to top)




63. Washington hawthorn (Crataegus phaenopyrum)

Northeast corner of Asmundson Hall
The Washington hawthorn is a small deciduous tree with a narrow canopy. Its bright red berries persist through the winter and attract birds. (back to top)




64. red ironbark (Eucalyptus sideroxylon)

Northwest of Kerr Hall
The red ironbark eucalyptus is a tall tree with blue-green leaves. Its bark is often blackened on the surface, but cracks reveal red underneath. (back to top)




65. carob (Ceratonia siliqua)

Southwest of Kerr Hall, on California Ave.
The carob tree is a small evergreen tree with shiny green leaves. The pods are used in the production of carob. (back to top)




66. chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus)

Northwest corner of Robbins Annex
The chaste tree is a small tree with showy flower spikes. The flowers appear in the spring and summer and attract butterflies. (back to top)




67. bunya-bunya (Araucaria bidwillii)

Northeast of Haring Hall
The bunya-bunya is a tall evergreen cone bearing plant with leaves that are sharp-pointed on the tips and seeds that taste like roasted chestnuts. (back to top)




68. coral tree (Erythrina crista-galli)

West side of Robbins Hall
This small deciduous tree has beautiful clusters of deep red flowers, flat bean-like pods (containing poisonous seeds), and thorny branches. (back to top)




69. smooth sumac (Rhus glabra)

Southwest entrance to Robbins Hall, facing Shields Ave.
This small, rapidly growing deciduous tree is short lived (20-30 years) and thrives in disturbed areas. Has deep red fall color and flower spikes appear throughout spring and summer. (back to top)




70. American elm (Ulmus americana)

South of Robbins Hall, on Peter J. Shields Ave.
The American elm is a tall deciduous tree that has a broad canopy. Its leaves are larger and lighter in color than that of the European elm. Makes an excellent street tree but is also susceptible to Dutch Elm disease. (back to top)




71. Spanish dagger (Yucca spp.)

Courtyard behind TB 114
The Spanish dagger is a small, evergreen, multi-stemmed, shrub-like tree. It has a tropical look with long strap like green leaves and cream colored showy flowers that appear in summer. (back to top)




72. Pacific sunset maple (Acer 'Warrenred')

West side of Chemistry
The Pacific Sunset® maple is a medium-sized deciduous tree with good fall color. (back to top)




73. tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera)

Planting area southwest of Chemistry
The tulip tree is a tall, pyramidal shaped, deciduous tree with green, tulip shaped flowers. Has attractive bright yellow fall foliage. (back to top)




74. bronze loquat (Eriobotrya deflexa)

North of Roessler Hall
The bronze loquat is a medium-sized evergreen tree. Leaves have a coppery color when young. Produces fragrant white flowers followed by inedible fruits. (back to top)




75. silver dollar gum (Eucalyptus polyanthemos)

Northeast of Physics/Geology
The silver dollar gum gets its name from its silvery round juvenile leaves. It is a tall evergreen tree with flaky bark. (back to top)




76. Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)

Southeast of Physics/Geology
The Italian cypress is a tall evergreen tree with dark green foliage. Because of its columnar shape, it is often planted closely together in rows to make a dense screen. (back to top)




77. evergreen pear (Pyrus kawakamii)

Northwest of King Hall
The evergreen pear is a medium-sized tree with glossy green leaves. White flowers appear on this tree in the spring. (back to top)




78. bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa)

Parking Lot #3, southwest corner
The bur oak is known for its large leaves and acorns. It is a tall tree with a broad canopy. (back to top)




79. blackwood acacia (Acacia melanoxylon)

South island Parking Lot #3
Blackwood acacia are medium-sized evergreen trees with dark green leaves and cream colored flowers. Thrives in heat and tolerates drought. (back to top)




80. Japanese crabapple (Malus x floribunda)

South island Parking Lot #3
The Japanese crabapple is a small deciduous tree with a showy display of pink and white flowers that appear in spring. Edible berries are enjoyed by birds and other wildlife. (back to top)




81. California buckeye (Aesculus californica)

South of King Hall, on bank of creek
The California buckeye is a small deciduous multitrunked tree that has creamy white fragrant flowers in the spring. Produces large green fruits containing glossy brown seeds. (back to top)




82. valley oak (Quercus lobata)

South of Putah Creek
This large valley oak specimen is native to California's Central Valley and is considered a heritage tree because of its age (estimated 300 years), good health, and size. (back to top)




83. deodar cedar (historic) (Cedrus deodara)

West of Buehler Alumni Center
These trees were part of an original Davis homestead and were planted in the late 1800's. They have historical significance and are prized for their good health and size. (back to top)




84. Italian cypress (historic) (Cupressus sempervirens)

West of Buehler Alumni Center
These trees were part of an original Davis homestead and were planted in the late 1800's. They have historical significance and are prized for their good health and size. (back to top)